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Wishing all of you a wonderful Thanksgiving with family and friends

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Wishing all of you a wonderful Thanksgiving with family and friends ...

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Parent Ed: Li’l ’Liza Jane
Did you know?

Music provides a rich opportunity to expose your child to words she may not hear in everyday conversation. Songs with simple melodies and substitution opportunities, like “Li’l ’Liza Jane,” are great for lyric variations that can incorporate new vocabulary words.

Try this activity with your child:
Use this song as a jumping-off point to talk about where your family is from—the cities or state where you and other family members grew up and the countries of your ancestors. You can also use this song to discover places in the world where you and your child want to go! For example:
• If Grandma is from Chicago:
“I know a girl that you do know, ________ (Grandma) is her name.”

“She grew up in Chicago, ________ is her name.”

• If your family has ancestors from Africa:
“I know a family that you do know, ________
(your family’s last name) is our name.”
“We come from Africa, ________ is our name.”

Simply sing the chorus as-is. Don’t worry if the words don’t exactly fit the melody— just have fun with it!
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Parent Ed: Funga Alafia Did you know? Experiencing a wide variety of ways to move helps children develop coordination, and moving to a song like “Funga Alafia” can also support bilateral coordination. There are several types of bilateral coordination, including: • the ability to do the same movement using both sides of the body at the same time, such as picking up a block with two hands; • moving in the same way but alternating sides of the body, such as walking; • or making different movements on each side of the body at the same time, such as throwing a ball with just one hand. Since bilateral coordination requires both sides of the brain to communicate and share information, a musical activity that fosters bilateral coordination also supports brain development. Try this activity with your child: As you sing this song, try moving one body part on just one side, to the beat (like raising and lowering your right arm). Then move both arms in the same way at the same time or move each arm in a different way at the same time. Your child is now experiencing different types of bilateral coordination. Have fun and experiment with different body parts!

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Parent Ed: Funga Alafia
Did you know?
Experiencing a wide variety of ways to move helps children develop coordination, and moving to a song like “Funga Alafia” can also support bilateral coordination. There are several types of bilateral coordination, including:

• the ability to do the same movement using both sides of the body at the same time, such as picking up a block with two hands;

• moving in the same way but alternating sides of the body, such as walking;

• or making different movements on each side of the body at the same time, such as throwing a ball with just one hand.

Since bilateral coordination requires both sides of the brain to communicate and share information, a musical activity that fosters bilateral coordination also supports brain development.

Try this activity with your child:
As you sing this song, try moving one body part on just one side, to the beat (like raising and lowering your right arm). Then move both arms in the same way at the same time or move each arm in a different way at the same time. Your child is now experiencing different types of bilateral coordination.
Have fun and experiment with different body parts!
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Parent Ed: Hey, Diddle, Diddle Did you know? Songs with words that rhyme, such as “Hey, Diddle, Diddle,” help children to hear and play with the individual sounds that come together to make a word. Classroom teachers call this skill phonological awareness—and it is important to your child’s language development. Try this activity with your child: If your child is older, ask him which words in this song rhyme or have a similar sound (e.g., “diddle” and “fiddle” or “moon” and “spoon”). Whether you have an infant or an older child, think of other words that rhyme and substitute them in the song for “diddle” and “moon.” When your child is ready, she can come up with her own words that rhyme. She can even use nonsense words and silly phrases! For example: • Hey, doodle, doodle, the cat and the noodle, the cow jumped over the hoop . . . The little dog laughed to see such sport, and the dish ran away with the soup . . . • Hey, chugga, chugga, the cat and the bugga, the cow jumped over the wak . . . The little dog laughed to see such sport, and the dish ran away with the zak . . .

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